Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Off tha Dome 900...12 RADIO SHOW

Check out the 12 RADIO SHOW. The 12 RADIO SHOW is the most innovative and interactive show on Blog Talk Radio. Tune in tonight at 9pm EST as the host, 12kyle, informs and entertains! Don't just listen to the a part of the show and participate in the interactive chat room...or call in to speak with 12kyle and his co-hosts.

TOPIC - Off tha Dome 900 cohosted by Mindful Naked. 

Join us as we cover random and thought provoking topics ranging from current events, pop culture, dating, relationships, sports, sex, & music.

You can listen online ( or via phone (347)215-7162. Press #1 if you want to speak to the host.

Follow the show on twitter: @12RadioShow. Also follow the host 12kyle on twitter: @12kyle

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Check out Dead End Sports tonight at 9pm est

If you've been under a rock for the past few months (lol), then you may not know that I host the Dead End Sports Show every Tuesday night at 9pm est. 

Check out Dead End Sports! This is the place where sports opinions collide. Dead End Sports is a weekly talk show covering college football, the NFL, college basketball, the NBA, baseball and more. We rarely agree.

On this week's episode we'll discuss the NCAA Tournament, the NBA, NFL Free Agency, sports and hip hop artists and much more.

Check out our website . Follow the show on twitter: @deadendsports as well as the Dead End Sports crew...Feefo - @feefo247 , Beezy - @beezy430 , Ken - @kbinge , & 12kyle - @12kyle

You can listen online ( or via phone (646)478-0356. Press #1 if you want to speak to the host. You can also send tweets if you want to have your questions answered or comments to @deadendsports

8 Reasons You Should Turn Down That Job Offer

here's a very interesting article that I found at

Just Because You Got the Offer Doesn't Mean You Should Accept It

The good news is you got the job. Which, in this still-reeling economy, is quite an accomplishment. But the bad news is you're worried you might be settling for a position that isn't the right fit for you. So where do you go from here?

Look, the honest truth is there are times when you'll have to take any job you can get, even if you know it's a bad fit. Maybe your house is about to be foreclosed on, you can't make rent, or you have a family depending on you for income. We completely understand there will be times when finding ANY job is a priority over the PERFECT job.

But then there's the flip side of that coin, which is taking a job just for the sake of having a job even if you have the luxury of holding out for something better. Maybe you're frustrated because your job search has taken far longer than expected, or you graduated college and you're the last of your friends to find steady employment. Those situations aren't ideal, but neither is taking a "filler" job that won't really benefit your career.

To help guide you, here are some very valid reasons to reject a job offer.

8. When It's a Dead-End, Not a Detour

Sometimes we travel a broken career road, but that's not all bad. Many success stories include colorful chapters where the hero bravely works his way up to corporate glory. But what about the sad dramas where the heroine ends up pausing her career indefinitely in a so-so job that moves her off-target and out-of-sight of her hopes and dreams?

Consider: Will the circuitous route still allow some sort of progress in your chosen direction? Or will the filler job effectively block the path to your desired destination? The best filler job will still allow you to grow skills and experiences that are resume-worthy, and easily applied at your next position. The worst ones can spiral you into a black hole from which you gain no additional skills or experience, essentially trapping you with no hope of escape.

7. When It Costs You Opportunities

Most jobs are found through networking. A job organizing office supplies in a backroom or basement will offer you few opportunities to rub elbows with anyone save the occasional lost soul seeking a restroom. On the other hand, a retail job selling business apparel might give you the inside scoop on unposted job listings. Remember, the clear majority of today’s employment opportunities are unadvertised.

Consider: If volunteer work or community service puts you in touch with a growing number of business contacts, it might be worth fueling that momentum rather than cutting yourself off with a short-term, bill-paying position. Obviously, if you’re in debt and behind on your bills, you may not have the luxury of timing. However, be certain that wherever you spend your 9 to 5, you remain in the vicinity of connections to your chosen career goals.

6. When It Hurts Your Professional Reputation

On the other hand, while assembling sandwiches in a company cafeteria will likely put you in contact with key decision-makers (even CEOs have to eat lunch), do you want to be remembered for a cheddar cheese mishap when you finally land that interview?

Consider: It’s one thing to wait tables as a new college graduate in search of that elusive first job. However, a displaced IT manager refilling iced teas is doing nothing to enhance that image of technical prowess. There is nothing wrong with honest labor. But aim for labor that won’t contradict your status and reputation as a professional. To wit, waiting tables would be consistent with a hospitality manager looking for her next gig. Web design work might be a better fit for the on-hold IT manager. 

5. When It's Soul-Crushing

How tough is your spirit? Can you retain essential hope and focus while working in the potential filler job? Some people own the sort of resilience that will not be trampled by janitorial duties or irate customers at a fast food establishment. Others have a tendency to link identity to work and their self-worth will deflate like a leaky balloon.

Consider: Know thyself. The purpose of a temporary job is to equip you -- financially and possibly experientially -- for the real deal. If a filler job is likely to grind down your self-image, perhaps you need to look a little longer. Find employment that will pay your bills without costing you your confidence and breaking your spirit.

4. When It Goes Against Your Morals & Values

The nature of your temporary work shouldn't make you feel like you're compromising who you are or your beliefs. Obviously you should avoid anything illegal, but beyond that black and white is a lot of grey. For instance, a vegetarian meat-packer, an environmentalist working for big oil, or a personal privacy advocate making telemarketing calls. These are scenarios that will pit self against self.

Consider: You will be ineffective and personally miserable in any position that requires you to ignore core values. Selling something that is personally disagreeable is a blow to your integrity. How will you sell the professionalism of someone willing to turn a blind eye to his own convictions?

3. When It Costs You Your Family

A great paycheck that takes you out-of-town -- or out of family life by nature of the sheer number of hours required -- may be a risk to your family connections. Yes, getting behind on your mortgage payment could strain family loyalties as well, but be sure you and your spouse (or significant other) are on the same page regarding expectations.

Consider: How "temporary" will temporary be? Are there other options that might provide a better balance to the financial vs. family stability equation? An indefinitely timed strain on familial relationships (and connections to your support system) should be approached with caution. Do you work to live or live to work? Just remember, no one on a deathbed ever wished they spent more time at work.

2. When the Money Isn't Good Enough

Sometimes, it really is all about the money.

Most of us work to live. We have mortgages, rent, utilities, car payments, daycare and more to pay for, and we're working to foot the bills. So if you're presented with a job that doesn't even come close to making all the ends meet, it might be worth holding out for something more lucrative if that's feasible.

Consider: Be clear about pay structures and costs of employment -- especially for commission-based work -- before grabbing a temporary position. The word "temporary" can ascribe less value to the details tied to these jobs. These details should matter, however, because you are making a trade of your job search time. Be sure it’s a worthwhile exchange.

1. When the Money Is TOO Good

Whoosh. That’s the soul-sucking sound of a lucrative paycheck pulling talent from a long-term goal. It happens. The pay is so good you stay on a little longer. And a little longer after that. Next thing you know you're completely hooked on your fat paycheck, 10 years have gone by, and you’ve forgotten you used to have other dreams.

Consider: If you’re a "work to live" personality with a goal of retirement, this may not be a deal-breaker. But if your goals are for professional achievement, be wary of temporary jobs that could lull you into career complacency. "Umm, I got busy and forgot" isn’t going to sit well with a bored, stagnated version of yourself, wondering about the untapped potential of your youth.

Keep Your Eyes on the Prize

"Any" job is often better than no job, but not necessarily. Measure "filler" jobs against your overall career plan. Be wary of any side gig that holds the power to hamstring you into a permanent sideline position.

Our career paths are rarely straight lines. Sometimes the route to a coveted sales position goes through the mailroom. And there are times that outside pressures and financial considerations force us to pause professional progress completely. These challenges are surmountable and may even provide valuable perspective, as long as hitting the pause button doesn't cause our motivation to idle as well.

Know What You're Worth

Regardless of whether or not you actually accept the job you're offered, the important thing is that you're prepared to negotiate salary if you do want it. The first thing you should do is research, so you're able to come to the table armed with the knowledge of what your job is worth. 

Monday, March 10, 2014

3 principles

There are three principles of business that I think are key to ANY successful business

1. Treat people with dignity and respect.

This goes a long way. It doesn't matter if you are dealing with the Vice President of your company or the kid in the mail room. Treat people well. They will always remember it and appreciate it.

2. Never be too "big" to do something.

Far too often...people will say "I'm not doing that. It's not in my job description. Let somebody else to it." If I'm the CEO and I see that the trash needs to be taken out of the building, then I'll do it. People respect you even more when they see you go the extra mile.

3. Make work fun

Nobody works for free. Most people spend 8 hrs a day at work. Help people ENJOY their time at work. You've gotta be you might as well have fun while you're there.

I've worked in corporate America for 15 yrs. I've learned a lot and seen a lot, too. One day...sooner than later...I'll transition to run my own company.

I'll be taking these principles with me.